interFIRE Home interFIRE Home interFIRE VR Support Training Calendar Training Center Resource Center Message Board Insurance Info
 

Beard, Richard D., Editor. Electric Motors. Refrigeration Service Engineers Society. 1984.

Abstract: This article explains electricity and magnetism and how they are related. The article also explains how an electric motor works and the different types of electric motors. Basically, the law of electricity states that an induced current is in the opposite direction to the current that produced the induced current. The induced current's magnetic field will naturally oppose the other magnetic field causing the armature magnets to push away the field magnets. This causes a rotation, which produces the electric motor. The article explains this process in detail and explains the many other factors involved.

The article goes on to describe the different types of motors and their differences. Induction, split-phase induction, capacitor-start induction, repulsion-induction, three-phase, and others are explained with diagrams.

The next section of the article explains how heat is produced from an electric motor. Most of the heat produced is from resistance and friction. Most motors are designed to accommodate this heat; however, the motor must be used and maintained properly. There must be enough space surrounding the motor for it to release its heat and objects should not be stored near the motor. The room in which the motor is operating should not be above 40 C. It is important to monitor the heat a motor generates because if it gets too hot it can damage the insulation, the wires, or the protective devices of the motor.

For more information, contact:
Refrigeration Service Engineers Society
666 Rand Road
DesPlaines, IL 60016-3552
Phone: (847)297-6464
Fax: (847) 297-5038
E-mail: general@rses.org

 
Home | interFIRE VR Support | Training Calendar | Training Center | Resource Center | Message Board | Insurance Info
Sponsorship Opportunities
Web Site Designed for 800 x 600 by Stonehouse Media Incorporated® Copyright © 2014 All Rights Reserved.